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Core Curriculum / Courses

Core Competencies are skills, knowledge, and proficiencies that form a foundation for developing an appreciation of local and global community; for demonstrating effective techniques in writing and evaluating argument; for under-standing leadership theory and developing a personal style that guides and inspires. In addition, Core Competencies enhance an understanding and appreciation of arts, language, and literature; teach reasoning using symbols and numbers, measurement, and properties to make decisions and predictions; and promote learning modern scientific and technological concepts, principles, and methods used to solve problems.

Core Competencies

CIVIC AND GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT (6 credits: 3 Domestic, 3 International)

Students will gain knowledge of historical and cultural context while developing an appreciation of community. Through acquiring foundational skills, students will be able to become advocates for effecting change in their local community and world.

Courses:

Domestic: International:
PS 101 American Government PS 200 Comparative Politics
SO 101 Introduction to Sociology HI 105 World Civilization I
HI 103 American Experience I HI 106 World Civilization II
HI 104 American Experience II EV 101 Environmental Sciences
SO 110 Multiculturalism BU 150 Introduction to Global Business
HI 2013 American Military History SE 210 Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism
EC 110 Microeconomics PY 101 Introduction to Psychology
PL 101 Introduction to Ethics
SO 120 Cultural Anthropology
EC 111 Principles of Macroeconomics

 

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION (3 credits)

Students will learn to conduct research writing that encompasses the stages of writing to refine writing and research that produces a persuasive argument.

Courses:
EN 102 Analytical Writing and Academic Research

LEADERSHIP (minimum 3 credits)

Students will identify and understand theories of leadership and develop a personal leadership style with ap-plication, to guide and inspire others.

Courses:
All Military Science Courses with Lab
IN 106 Leadership Theory and Practice

CULTURES (3 credits)

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the arts, language, and literature. They will broaden their un-derstanding of themselves and others through the study of diverse cultures, foreign languages and/or artistic perspective.

Courses:
All Literature Courses
All Fine Arts Courses
All Language Courses

QUANTITATIVE REASONING (3 credits)

Students will develop an understanding of quantitative reasoning that includes the use of numbers and sym-bols, measurement and properties and how to make decisions, judgments, and predictions.

Courses:
All math courses except developmental level

SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS (3 credits)

Students will learn the fundamental principles underlying modern scientific and technological ideas and con-cepts, and use those concepts to solve problems.

Courses:
All Science courses with a lab.

Course Descriptions

PS 101 American Government
Co-Requisite of EN 101
The course provides a survey of the basic concepts of political science, political theory, public policy and American politics. The func- tions, processes and organization of government and public policy are discussed. Students will develop the ability to evaluate politics and the public policy process.
Three hours per week; three semester-hours credit.
Fulfills Civic and Global Engagement-Domestic Core Competency Requirement

SO 101 Introduction to Sociology
This one semester course is a study of sociology as a science of social organization and interaction with contemporary reality. The course includes analysis of certain conditions of our social environment that we often ignore, neglect, or take for granted; develop- ment of a sociological consciousness, emphasizing ethics and human dignity, thorough scrutiny of group dynamics; social stratifica- tion; causes of inequalities of race, ethnicity and gender; political and economic power; education from the functionalist, conflict, and bureaucratic perspectives; concluding with examination of social change and process in the world.
Three hours per week; three semester-hours credit
Fulfills Civic and Global Engagement-International Core Competency

HI 103 American Experience I
Co-requisite: EN 101.
A history of the United States through the Civil War using a critical-thinking approach. Social, religious, ethnic, and economic compo- nents of major events and movements in American history will be examined. Countervailing essays on select critical issues will help ca- dets hone their analytical skills. Highlights of American Experience I will include studies of Native Americans, the colonial and early slave experience, the founding of our nation, the growth of a national economy, 19th century reform movements, and the rise of sectional- ism and the Civil War.
Three hours per week; three semester-hours credit.
Fulfills Civic and Global Engagement—Domestic Core Competency

HI 104 American Experience II
Co-requisite: EN 101.
Highlights in American Experience II will include the rise of “Jim Crow” and segregation; the urbanization and industrialization of Amer- ica, and the impact of immigration; America becoming a colonial empire and joining the international world balance of power; the effects of major war and Depression on American society; the New Deal; the transformation of America into a national security state due to World War II and the Cold War; the transformation of American society from Civil Rights to Black Power, from Women’s Rights to Women’s Liberation; and the anti-war movement during the Vietnam era.
Three hours per week; three semester-hours credit.
Fulfills Civic and Global Engagement—Domestic Core Competency

HI 2013 American Military History
Prerequisite: EN 101
American Military History, 1607-2003. A one semester course in the military history of the United States from 1607-2004. Coverage includes the Jamestown colony of 1607, colonial militia systems, the wars of annihilation against Indians and the struggle for Empire among the Europeans, culminating in the American Revolution. The War of 1812, Mexican War and Spanish American Wars are dis- cussed. Emphasis is placed on the Civil War, World Wars I and II, Korean, Vietnam, Gulf War and Iraq. Topics include the civil- military relationship; the unique impact of American geography, weak neighbors, and dual military traditions; the Root reforms; the National Defense Act of 1947, and the Goldwater-Nichols Act of 1986. Major exams, frequent quizzes on assigned reading and a criti- cal book review are assigned.
Three hours per week; three semester-hours credit.
Fulfills Civic and Global Engagement Core Competency

EC 110 Microeconomics
Co-requisite: MA 099.
Microeconomics introduces economic analysis of individual, business, and industry choices in the market economy. Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, in- come distribution, market failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to achieve economic objectives efficiently.
Three hours per week; three semester-hours credit.; Formerly EC 102 Microeconomics
Fulfills Civic and Global Engagement–Domestic Core Competency

HI 105 World Civilization I
Co-requisite: EN 101.
History 111 begins with the ancestors of the earliest humans in Africa and the domestication of crops and animals in the earliest river societies of Babylonia, India, and China. The course compares the development of agricultural surplus, government, cities, mythology and religion, and writing, the ancient civilizations of Sumeria and Egypt, India, China, Africa and Mesoamerica. While stressing the mon- otheism of the Hebrews on Christianity and Islam, the course also covers Hinduism, Buddhism, the great age of Confucius, the earliest Chinese empires, and the process of East-West trade via the Silk Road. The course outlines the Greek, Roman and Han civilizations and their empires. Also mentioned are the early Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations as well as the Kush, Arab states of Africa, Great Zimba- bwe, slavery and the impact of the slave trade. The Mongol conquest of China, the spread of Chinese culture to Korea and Japan, and the Ming dynasty receive mention. The course compares the impact of western and eastern feudalism, the significance of the knight in Eu- rope and the samurai in Japan. The rise and spread of Islam, the great Arab empires, and the contribution of Indian, Chinese, and Arab science and philosophy are noted. The course ends with the fall of Constantinople and the search for alternative sources for spices leading to the spread of western thought, militarism, and diseases.
Three hours per week; three semester-hours credit.
Fulfills Civic and Global Engagement—International Core Competency

HI 106 World Civilization II
Co-requisite: EN 101
History 106 begins with the religious transformation of Europe with the Reformation. The Mughals conquest of India and their contri- butions to art and architecture are stressed. The Qing dynasty and population explosion in China, the rise of Tokugawa Japan, and me- dieval Korea and Vietnam receive attention. The Scientific Revolution and its advances in astronomy, mathematics, and physics are recalled along with the Enlightenment of Voltaire, Montesquieu, and Rousseau. The course outlines revolutions in North and South America, France, and the impact of Napoleon. Coverage of the Industrial Revolution includes its impact on population, standard of living, as well as its economic and political impact on Africa, South East Asia, China, and eventually Japan. Nationalism, colonialism, imperialism, and competing alliances coalesced into World War I and the collapse of the Ottoman, Austro-Hungarian, Russian, and German empires. The failure of the Versailles Treaty and the League of Nations gave way to the rise of dictatorships, the Second World War, the Holocaust, and atomic weapons. Colonialism’s collapse followed as well as the Cold War; its proxy wars in Korea and Vietnam are covered. The course ends with the uncertain future of globalization and the rise of Asia amidst the threat of Islamic terror- ism. Three hours of instruction and three credit hours.
Three hours per week; three semester-hours credit
Fulfills Civic and Global Engagement– International Core Competency

BU 150 Introduction to Global Business
The globalization of business is bringing both new prosperity and new challenges to business leaders across the globe. In recognition of the changing face of business, VFMC offers an introductory course in international issues of culture, language, law, ethics and business practices. As a class project, students will produce a nation study, and draw conclusions as to investment in a foreign country.
Three hours per week; three semester hours credit; Formerly BU 205 International Business Fulfills Civic and Global Engagement-International Core Competency

SE 210 Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism
This course will provide a comprehensive and interdisciplinary survey of the history, theory, and modern-day political manifestations of terrorism and counterterrorism. It will also delve into some of the key areas relating to strategic and tactical responses. These will include planning, prevention, detection, disruption, and interdiction, as well as emergency response, dealing with the aftermath. Three hours per week; three semester-hours credit.; Formerly CJ 210 Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism
Fulfills Civic and Global Engagement – International Core Competency

PY 101 Introduction to Psychology
This one semester course serves as an introduction to the study of behaviors and mental processes. It covers the major contributors, theories, and concepts significant to the development of the field, both historical and contemporary. Major areas of investigation in- clude heredity and environment, sensation and perception, motivation, learning and social behavior.
Three hours per week; three semester-hours credit.
Fulfills Civic and Global Engagement—Domestic Core Competency

PL 101 Introduction to Ethics
The subject of ethics applies to numerous fields of study, including business, medicine, the environment, social justice, and much more. This course will focus on the history of ethics from Socrates, Aquinas, and Kant to Nietzsche. The contributions of scholars and philoso- phers from eastern cultures will also be explored. This foundation will lead to discussions on current issues relating to freedom, equality and individual rights. Modern case studies of ethical dilemmas will be examined and debated.
Three hours per week; three semester-hours credit.
Fulfills Civic and Global Engagement—International Core Competency

SO 120 Cultural Anthropology
This course examines human culture and its role in shaping behavior. Relationships of kinship, gender, economics and technology within various cultures in various eras will be reviewed.
Three hours per week for 3 semester hours of credit.

EC 111 Principles of Macroeconomics
Co-requisite: MA 099.
Macroeconomics introduces economic analysis of aggregate employment, income, and prices. Topics include major schools of eco- nomic thought; aggregate supply and demand; economic measures, fluctuations, and growth; money and banking; stabilization tech- niques; and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate national economic components, conditions, and alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals.
Three hours per week; three semester-hours credit.; Formerly EC 101 Macroeconomics
Fulfills Civic and Global Engagement-International Core Competency

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