Summer Course Catalog

Summer Sessions Course Offerings

Valley Forge Military College offers three online summer sessions which will run from May 12, 2014 through August 22, 2014. VFMC students can register via their online student portal. We invite Visiting Students to attend our summer sessions, register today by visiting the estudent portal to set up your account.

*See course descriptions below

SUMMER ONE: May 12-June 13, 2014

Course #

Course Name

# Credits

Total Cost 

HI 105 World Civilization I 3.0 $800
SP 101 Intro to Spanish I 3.0 $800
MA 101 College Algebra 3.0 $800
PS 102 International Relations 3.0 $800
PY 101 Intro to Psychology 3.0 $800
PL 101 Introduction to Ethics 3.0 $800

 

SUMMER TWO: June 16-July 18, 2014

Course #

Course Name

# Credits

Total Cost 

LT 210 World Literature and Empire 3.0 $800
SP 102 Intro to Spanish II 3.0 $800
MA 103 Pre-Calculus 4.0 $1,000
MA 110 Foundations of Math 3.0 $800
SO 101 Intro to Sociology 3.0 $800
EN 102 Analytical Writing 3.0 $800

SUMMER THREE: July 21-August 22, 2014

Course #

Course Name

# Credits

Total Cost 

EN 101 Composition and Rhetoric 3.0 $800
MA 104 Calculus I 4.0 $1,000
MA 100 Intermediate Algebra 3.0 $800
CJ 101 Intro to Criminal Justice 3.0 $800
MA 101 College Algebra 3.0 $800
BU 105 Introduction to Business 3.0 $800

Course Descriptions


BU 105: Introduction to Business
Three credit hours
This course is a comprehensive introduction to the functional areas of business: management and organization, human resource management, marketing, information systems and accounting, and finance and investment. Core topics highlighted within these areas include ethics and social responsibility, small business concerns and entrepreneurship, and global issues. The students will participate step-by-step in the preparation of a real Business Plan.  arrow


CJ 101: Introduction to Criminal Justice
Three credit hours
A survey of the philosophy and history of law enforcement. Students gain a knowledge of the basic organization and jurisdiction of local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies. The course explores the duties, guidelines, and ethical principles followed by the law enforcement officer, including the legal basis on which his/her authority rests. An examination of the United States court system and the complete procedure from arrest to sentencing is covered. arrow


EN 101: Composition and Rhetoric
Three credit hours
This first course in the year-long freshman writing sequence introduces students to academic discourse. Students refine their critical read-ing and thinking skills, participate in collaborative learning, and apply a full range of ideas and theories to their writing. Students will compose four formal essays responding to representative writings from diverse academic disciplines. Each assignment is developed through a series of related steps emphasizing the dynamics of the writing process, including: pre-writing, peer editing, and revision. Students benefit from a review of grammar essentials and an introduction to basic citation skills. In addition, students have multiple opportunities to strengthen their oral communication skills and leadership abilities through in-class presentations and peer collaboration. arrow


EN 102: Analytical Writing, Argument & Academic Research
Three credit hours
Prerequisite: EN 101

EN 102 is the second half of the two semester freshman writing requirement. This course concentrates on the development of the re-searched argument. Students learn to develop and defend a thesis backed by scholarly sources in papers employing an appropriate documentation format. Through selected readings and writings, students are challenged to identify and compare opposing viewpoints in order to define and understand the elements of controversy surrounding the issues being investigated. Concurrently, students are introduced to methods of analyzing and synthesizing source material, the elements and structure of argument and the process of practical academic research. arrow


LT210: World Literature and Empire
Three credit hours
Prerequisite: EN 101
This is a survey of global literary traditions as seen through the lens of the rise and fall of empire. Using cultural and historical context, students trace universal themes in the four quadrants of empire – Roots of Empire, Rising Empire, High Empire, and Falling or Mature Empire — that transcend geographic boundaries. We hope to explore the uniqueness of a number of literary traditions — Asian, African, Native American and Caribbean as well as traditional western sources. Students have a wide variety of opportunities for oral and written expression with emphasis on literary analysis and criticism. arrow


HI 105: World Civilization I
Three credit hours
Co-requisite: EN 101
History 111 begins with the ancestors of the earliest humans in Africa and the domestication of crops and animals in the earliest river societies of Babylonia, India, and China. The course compares the development of agricultural surplus, government, cities, mythology and religion, and writing, the ancient civilizations of Sumeria and Egypt, India, China, Africa and Mesoamerica. While stressing the monotheism of the Hebrews on Christianity and Islam, the course also covers Hinduism, Buddhism, the great age of Confucius, the earliest Chinese empires, and the process of East-West trade via the Silk Road. The course outlines the Greek, Roman and Han civilizations and their empires. Also mentioned are the early Maya, Aztec, and Inca civilizations as well as the Kush, Arab states of Africa, Great Zimbabwe, slavery and the impact of the slave trade. The Mongol conquest of China, the spread of Chinese culture to Korea and Japan, and the Ming dynasty receive mention. The course compares the impact of western and eastern feudalism, the significance of the knight in Eu-rope and the samurai in Japan. The rise and spread of Islam, the great Arab empires, and the contribution of Indian, Chinese, and Arab science and philosophy are noted. The course ends with the fall of Constantinople and the search for alternative sources for spices leading to the spread of western thought, militarism, and diseases. arrow



SP 101-102: Introduction to Spanish I and Introduction to Spanish II
Three credit hours
Pre-requisite for SP 102: SP101 or satisfactory performance on placement exam.
This two-semester introductory sequence provides instruction and practice in the four skill areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. These courses focus on the development of communicative skills in oral and written expression. In-class practice and inde-pendent oral and written exercises support these objectives. Cultural readings foster an awareness and appreciation of the values, practices, and perspectives of the Hispanic world. arrow


PS 102: International Relations 
Three credit hours
Co-Requisite of EN 101

The course is designed as an introduction to the diplomatic, economic, psychological, military, and cultural relations between states and the international order. Global issues like war, terrorism, population control, climate change, food scarcity, nuclear proliferation, immigrant migrations, resource competition and inter-civilization conflict are analyzed and discussed. Employing an interdisciplinary focus, the course examines the impact of globalization on nation state, regional, ecological, economic, military, and food security in the 21st century. arrow


MA 100: Intermediate Algebra
Three credit hours
Prerequisite: MA 099 / VFMC placement exam
This course is designed to provide students with algebraic knowledge and skills for success in subsequent credited math courses. Topics include: factoring, fractions, linear and fractional equations and inequalities, functions and their graphs, exponents and radicals, and quadratic equations. arrow


MA 101: College Algebra
Three credit hours
Prerequisite: MA 099/ VFMC Placement Exam.

This course is designed for Associate of Science and Associate of Business Administration majors. Topics of the College Algebra course with applications, include: real and complex numbers, algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions, graphing, and solving various types of equations including polynomial, radical and absolute value. Functions, inverse functions, graphs and transformations. arrow


MA 110: Foundations of Math I
Three credit hours
Prerequisite: MA 099/VFMC Placement Exam
This course is designed for non science majors. This course will provide students with an appreciation of and experience in using the concepts, logical reasoning, and problem-solving techniques involved in various fields of mathematics. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: use inductive and deductive reasoning to draw logical conclusions from a given set of information, use the notation and operations of set theory, add, subtract, multiply and divide in systems of numeration other than base 10, and analyze the real number system. arrow


MA 103: Pre-Calculus
Four credit hours
Prerequisite: Math 101/VFMC placement exam.
This course provides a foundation for students planning to take calculus. Topics include, trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, analytic geometry, polar coordinates and vectors. This course also contains a brief review of topics from college Algebra. arrow


MA 104: Calculus I
Four credit hours
Prerequisite: MA 103/ VFMC Placement Test.
This one semester course opens with a review of Pre-calculus functions and graphs. It progresses to a treatment of limit theory as the foundation for a fundamental understanding of differentiation. The rules of differentiation are thoroughly explored as the cornerstone of the numerous applications of the derivative in the real world. With an understanding of the derivative’s role, discussion shifts to the anti-derivative, where fundamental anti-derivative (integration) concepts and techniques are investigated. The course concludes with an exposure to differentiation and integration techniques of the logarithmic and exponential functions. arrow


PY 101: Introduction to Psychology
Three credit hours
This one semester course serves as an introduction to the study of behaviors and mental processes. It covers the major contributors, theories, and concepts significant to the development of the field, both historical and contemporary. Major areas of investigation in-clude heredity and environment, sensation and perception, motivation, learning and social behavior. arrow


SO 101: Introduction to Sociology
Three credit hours
This one semester course is a study of sociology as a science of social organization and interaction with contemporary reality. The course includes analysis of certain conditions of our social environment that we often ignore, neglect, or take for granted; develop-ment of a sociological consciousness, emphasizing ethics and human dignity, thorough scrutiny of group dynamics; social stratifica-tion; causes of inequalities of race, ethnicity and gender; political and economic power; education from the functionalist, conflict, and bureaucratic perspectives; concluding with examination of social change and process in the world. arrow


PL 101: Introduction to Ethics
Three credit hours
The subject of ethics applies to numerous fields of study, including business, medicine, the environment, social justice, and much more. This course will focus on the history of ethics from Socrates, Aquinas, and Kant to Nietzsche. The contributions of scholars and philosophers from eastern cultures will also be explored. This foundation will lead to discussions on current issues relating to freedom, equality and individual rights. Modern case studies of ethical dilemmas will be examined and debated. arrow

DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT: 2014 SUMMER COURSE DESCRIPTIONS