Cadet Life

The Full Life of Cadets

Life as a cadet is rich, meaningful and fun. The process of overcoming challenges—whether it’s a difficult exam or an obstacle course—is deeply rewarding, even exhilarating. And facing these challenges together alongside other cadets is how deep, lasting friendships are forged.

Covid-19 Update

VFMAC is open and is offering full-time boarding for the fall of 2020.

In order to keep our students safe, VFMAC is only offering Boarding Options and not offering Day School
and 5-Day options for the first semester of the 2020-2021 school year.

Happy Birthday to the United States Air Force! Aim High....Fly-Fight-Win! ...

On National POW/MIA Recognition Day, we pause to remember the sacrifices and service of those who were Prisoners of War, as well as those who are Missing in Action, and their families. #YouAreNotForgotten ...

Brotherhood

Our Cadets come from all over the world but quickly bond and become family.
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Life Skills

Cadets had a quick start into our new Life Skills program this week. In Theater and Set Design they had already broken out the power tools.
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Cadet Barrow, Bravo Company Commander after leading his company onto the Parade Field and about to be sworn into the Honor Council. ...

Plebes took their Oath's yesterday, to both themselves and to the Corps of Cadets.

This young man has been on campus for just a few days and is already leading from the front by volunteering to be first in line at the barber shop. He described his previous hairstyle as "messy".
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This morning, at 8:46, #VFMC's Army ROTC Cadre and Cadets began their mission to walk 2,071 stairs on #VFMAC's campus- the same amount that firefighters had to walk /run in the stairwells of the Twin Towers on 9/11. The Cadre and Cadets walked a loop that included three sets of stairs with gear and weighted packs while 9/11 dispatcher calls played through the loud speaker.

When the mission was complete, Army ROTC Professor of Military Science, LTC Gambacorta, spoke to the cadets, many of which were not yet born when the event occurred, and gave some perspective to the day. "Those 2,071 stairs were essentially their commute to work. After those 2,071 stairs they were exhausted and had to bring calm to a difficult situation. You need to be physically fit enough, mentally fit enough, that after the chaos of getting there, you bring calm to the situation and then you actually go to work and do your job. Just getting there is not enough for us."

The American flag carried during the mission belongs to Army ROTC Senior Military Instructor MSG Newton and has been on every deployment with him.

@vfmcarmyrotc @vfmc_rotc_pms
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Durrell ‘Bronko’ Pearsall '86‚ age 34‚ was a member of the New York Fire Department’s Rescue 4 in Queens. ‘Bronko’ was passionate in his love for his job and his ‘brothers’ in the FDNY. He was finishing his shift the morning of September 11‚ 2001‚ when the call came about the WTC. Without hesitation he volunteered to respond‚ along with several others from his firehouse.

He is remembered for his zest for life and his comical personality. ‘Bronko’ will be forever remembered by his countless friends.
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From an early age‚ he dreamed of becoming a fireman. ‘Bronko‚’ following in his father’s footsteps‚ began his firefighting career as a volunteer with Hempstead Fire Department on Long Island. He received numerous commendations and two Medals of Valor. He was also a Nassau fire educator. Durrell joined the #FDNY in 1993‚ a member of Squad 1 and then Rescue 4. He was preparing for his next goal‚ a lieutenant in the FDNY. He pursued several personal interests within the department.

He was active as a member and co-captain of ‘The Bravest Football Club‚’ gaining experience with his college team at C.W. Post. His love for football extended outside the department as well‚ as he was a devoted fan of Notre Dame football.

Fiercely proud of his Irish heritage‚ ‘Bronko’ played the snare drum in the FDNY’s Emerald Society Pipe and Drums. All members of the band gathered outside his funeral at St. Patrick’s Cathedral to ‘pipe him to Heaven.’
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2,071 Stairs.

Never Forget. 09.11.2001
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Today we honor, respect, and remember those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001. #PatriotDay ...

The Corps of Cadets

The structure of cadet life is governed by the Corps of Cadets, a cadet-led system which administers the implementation of rules, traditions and many activities. The Corps follows a military structure, headed by a Commandant of Cadets, and with a Chain of Command through which the delegation of authority descends. This system provides cadets with countless opportunities to experience both leading and following well, in the context of their peers.

Plebe System

To become a recognized member of the Corps of Cadets, one must successfully complete a period of training known as the “Plebe System.” The Plebe System is designed to orient new VFMAC students with our cadet-led community and our customs and traditions. It is a period of adjustment that every cadet who attends Valley Forge undertakes. It is a time honored “rite of passage” that binds all those who attended Valley Forge in a common bond of brotherhood.

This process determines that each has the requisite skills, traits, and attributes to achieve success in all programs at Valley Forge. The process of overcoming challenges-whether it’s a difficult exam or an obstacle course-is deeply rewarding, even exhilarating. And facing these challenges together alongside other cadets is how deep, lasting friendships are forged.

Cadet Life

Within the structure of the Corps of Cadets, there are many programs to make cadet life rich and interesting. The Cadet Life Program assists cadets in developing the social and life skills that will help them throughout their lives. The program offers character, religious, social, and physical programs to assist the cadet’s development as a whole person. In addition to their regular academic schedules, cadets have access to numerous clubs, activities, and honor societies, providing further opportunities to develop and pursue personal interests.

Honor Code of Conduct

“A cadet will not lie, cheat, steal, nor tolerate those who do.” The Honor Code of Conduct permeates every aspect of cadet life. The Corps is the guardian of this Honor Code and helps administer its enforcement.

Character Development Program

Each month a different honor trait is emphasized: Honesty, Trustworthiness, Respect, Service, Courage, Self-Discipline, Responsibility, Caring and Perseverance. These monthly traits are integrated into the academic disciplines and throughout the cadet company, giving cadets an opportunity to meaningfully engage with these different virtues and encouraging them, in the words of the Cadet Resolution, to “aspire to a life of honorable service.”

Community Service & Volunteer Programs

Academy and College cadets are engaged in a variety of projects and activities at schools, nursing homes, churches, and food banks where they can contribute to the betterment of the community.

Religious Life and Fellowship Groups

In addition to the nondenominational Sunday Chapel service and afternoon Catholic Mass, there are arrangements made for Muslim and Jewish cadets to observe holy days. There are also fellowship groups throughout the week available for cadets to further their religious education.

Residence Life

Our dedicated staff, faculty, and TAC team (Teach, Advise, Counsel) is on hand to help with the development of each cadet, assisting with interpersonal communication, life skills and personal growth.

 

The Guidon

The Guidon is our Cadet Handbook that explains VMFAC’s traditions, code of conduct, honor system, wellness, procedures, cadet life, honors and awards.

Learn More

The best way to really understand what life is like at VFMAC is to speak with current and former cadets. Contact us today, and we will connect you with cadets who will share their personal experience with you.